Yasukuni Sakura Matsuri

During the end of March until the beginning of April you can enjoy the Yasukuni Sakura Matsuri. The Yasukuni Shrine is one of the most popular spots to enjoy Sakura. There are about 400 Sakura Trees around the area. When all of them are in full bloom it creates a magical, pink view and during the evenings they will be lit-up. You can also find lots of delicious food as there are many food stalls spread over the area during this Sakura Festival.

The Yasukuni Shrine (靖国神社) itself is a Shinto shrine that commemorates Japan’s war dead, such as the Boshin War, the Seinan War, the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars, World War I, the Manchurian Incident, the China Incident and the Greater East Asian War (World War II). A political controversy surrounds Yasukuni Shrine because since 1978, 14 class A war criminals are among the 2.5 million people enshrined at Yasukuni.

Text from the official website: ‘The difference between Yasukuni Shrine and other foreign memorial institutions for war dead is that the shrine enshrines the spirits of those who died on public duty of protecting their mother land. This difference might be causing misunderstanding. However, the nature of the shrine has its origin in the traditional Japanese way of thinking which is to commemorate the deceased eternally by enshrining them as object of worship.’

The Yasukuni Shrine is a 3 minute walk from Kudanshita Station (Shinjuku Subway Line, Hanzomon Subway Line and the Tozai Line).
Official Yasukuni Shrine website (in English): http://www.yasukuni.or.jp/english/index.html

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